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Over December 24 and 25, on the recommendation of Gary North (whom I respect, despite his theocratic inclinations), I viewed the latest version of the two-hour PBS Frontline documentary Who Was Lee Harvey Oswald?. The documentary is, as is typical of Frontline, very professionally presented. The interviews with persons who knew Oswald are especially useful at revealing Oswald’s nature and political beliefs. After viewing the documentary, I looked at some of Oswald’s personal political writings as presented by the Warren Commission. The writings reveal a man who was clearly disillusioned with Soviet Communism, but continued to oppose publicly traded companies and unequal ownership of business. Oswald’s public pronouncements were consistent in his opposition to Soviet Communism, but they clearly display Oswald’s support for the Fidel Castro regime in Cuba. Indeed, Oswald contradicted himself in the above-linked to interview, saying “We do not support the man“, yet later saying “Quite the contrary, we believe that it is a necessity in supporting democracy to support Fidel Castro and his right to make his country any way he wants to.“. All the evidence I have seen indicates Oswald’s opposition to capitalism and support for Castro was sincere. Indeed, there is evidence Castro had some foreknowledge of Oswald’s attempt to assassinate Kennedy, and not just from Warren Commission Document 1359. Whether Castro’s allegation that the Kennedy assassination must have required at least three gunmen to complete in time and that the Kennedy assassination was most likely done by Castro opponents is mistaken or deliberately made up is uncertain. The Cuban government would certainly have had no problem with a Kennedy assassination, as it tried to orchestrate one of its own creation in 1962 –it wasn’t exactly the smallest risk-taker on the planet. The only person besides Kennedy Oswald tried to kill was Edwin Walker, a Bircher. Oswald also seems to have communicated this assassination attempt to Cuban intelligence. As Oswald left his wedding ring behind on the day he shot Kennedy, and the Cuban embassy was the first place known to us where he communicated his intention to kill Kennedy, it appears likely that Oswald’s plan after his assassination of John F. Kennedy was to go back to the Cuban embassy in Mexico, whether on the week he shot Kennedy or some time later. The most likely motives I can think of for Oswald’s assassination of Kennedy are to improve U.S.-Cuban relations and to convince the Cuban government that Oswald was a useful friend of theirs that they should allow into Cuba. In any case, the Kennedy assassination may have saved Castro’s life -Lyndon Johnson “abandoned the objective of Castro’s overthrow” (here, p. 177).

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