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The Baltics are excluded from consideration in this post. This is the current (2013) ranking of former Soviet republics in real GDP per capita (PPP) terms. The statement in brackets refers to change in country/republic rank from the year 1990.

1. Russia (from 1) [0]

2. Kazakhstan (from 2) [0]

3. Belarus (from 6) [Up 3]

4. Azerbaijan (from 4) [0]

5. Turkmenistan (from 5) [0]

6. Ukraine (from 3) [Down 3]

7. Armenia (from 9) [Up 2]

8. Georgia (from 7) [Down 1]

9. Uzbekistan (from 12) [Up 3]

10. Moldova (from 8) [Down 2]

11. Kyrgyzstan (from 11) [0]

12. Tajikistan (from 10) [Down 2]

These, consequently, are the best and worst performers in changing their real GDP per capita (PPP) rankings in the FSU since 1990:

1. Belarus and Uzbekistan [Up 3]

2. Armenia [Up 2]

3. No change: Russia, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan

4. Georgia [Down 1]

5. Moldova and Tajikistan [Down 2]

6. Ukraine [Down 3]

Here is another ranking: country’s real GDP per capita in 2013 compared to that at relevant 1990s business cycle trough:

1. Azerbaijan: 5.00X

2. Armenia: 4.09X

3. Belarus: 3.24X

4. Turkmenistan: 3.21X

5. Georgia: 3.17X

6. Kazakhstan: 2.78X

7. Tajikistan: 2.34X

8. Uzbekistan: 2.26X

9. Russia: 2.11X

10. Moldova: 1.99X

11. Ukraine: 1.90X

12. Kyrgyzstan: 1.83X

Thus, the below is the annualized growth rate in real GDP per capita in each former Soviet country between the year it hit its respective 1990s business cycle trough and 2013:

Azerbaijan: 9.35%

Turkmenistan: 7.37%

Armenia: 7.3%

Belarus: 6.75%

Georgia: 6.26%

Kazakhstan: 5.85%

Tajikistan: 5.13%

Russia: 5.11%

Moldova: 5.05%

Uzbekistan: 4.92%

Ukraine: 4.38%

Kyrgyzstan: 3.42%

What’s the matter with Kyrgyzstan? Its terrible education system? Its lack of industries built up during the Soviet era? Its geographic isolation? It’s certainly interesting that Ethiopia and Armenia are rapidly growing, but Kyrgyzstan isn’t. Also, the Belarussian economic miracle (which, for different reasons in each year, stalled in 2012 and 2013) hasn’t at all been emphasized in the U.S. media.

 

 

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