Contrary to media rumors, innuendos, and lies, Trump’s plan for the illegal immigrants already in the U.S. has always been consistent. It is similar in form to Mrs. Hutchison’s plan back in 2007, a more conservative alternative (which the National Review at the time nevertheless condemned as cuckservative) to Democrat immigration plans at the time. Senator Sessions voted Nay to tabling the proposal when it was voted on, as it was an amendment in a conservative direction, even though it was not Mr. Sessions preferred option. The plan is a “touchback” one, which necessitates permission for presently existing illegal immigrant legal status only after those illegals have applied back from their home countries. Trump has always referred to this as the “door in the wall”, making his intentions clear a whole multitude of times in 2015.

Despite this fairly lax (for the alt-right) plan for currently existing illegal immigrants, Trump was still rated in third place on immigration in the Numbers USA scorecard in February, just behind conservative anti-amnesty rock stars Rick Santorum and Ted Cruz, despite making the exact same statements about the “door in the wall” he has always made during his campaign. Ted Cruz, just like Donald Trump, had no real ideas about whether or not to deport the existing 11 million, though he had always opposed a path to citizenship for them. Ted Cruz, being an Ivy League-educated lawyer, never actually said he’d support illegal immigrants “coming out of the shadows”. But it’s really difficult to read

I don’t want immigration reform to fail. I want immigration reform to pass. And so I would urge people of good faith on both sides of the aisle if the objective is to pass common sense immigration reform that secures the borders, that improves legal immigration and that allows those who are here illegally to come in out of the shadows, then we should look for areas of bipartisan agreement and compromise to come together. And this amendment, I believe if this amendment were to pass, the chances of this bill passing into law would increase dramatically.

as doing anything but Ted Cruz supporting some kind of lawful permanent resident status for the vast majority of the presently existing illegal immigrant population, at least in 2013. Trump’s touchback proposal at least offers the prospect of some kind of screening process for the illegals presently existing in the U.S., which Cruz’s implied position doesn’t.

I was a bit surprised at Trump picking as VP somebody who didn’t agree with him on nearly any position -except immigration. Pence was a leading proponent of touchback (with likely amnesty) during his time in the House. Again, both the National Review and VDARE condemned the idea as cuckservative at the time, though not using that specific word.

Nevertheless, from exit polls, it is clear that despite Ted Cruz having pretty much exactly the same position on illegal immigration as Donald Trump, those supporting deporting the 11 million gravitated to Trump, even in Wisconsin. I still have no clue whether they made the right choice. Ted Cruz’s natural instincts are conservative, and in the direction of greater, rather than lesser, immigration restriction. He only proposed his amendment as a compromise measure. Trump, meanwhile, is totally independent, and, while his touchback plan is, on paper, preferable to Cruz’s implied 2013 proposal, it should be worrisome for immigration restrictionists that it was not made from a position of weakness, as Cruz’s was, but from a position of strength.

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