The graph tells it all:
primaryvgeneralresults

There was surprisingly little love for HRC in the general election in Arkansas (practically none of the PUMAs came back to the Democratic Party), though Missouri is less of a surprise. Indiana, Montana and Missouri have basically the same voting patterns, with Montana being slightly redder than the other two.

West Virginia was the only state in the nation (though by no means the only place in the nation) to have more Democratic primary votes than Hillary general election votes. HRC came very close to getting more primary votes than general election votes in Mingo and Logan counties in WV. I suspect Bernie Sanders would have gotten even fewer votes than HRC did in WV.

Here are some of the more blatant cases of party disunity I’ve found:

localprimarygeneralpartydisunity

Monroe County, OH is a fracking-dependent county in eastern Ohio where the number of Democratic primary votes greatly exceeded the number of HRC general election votes, probably an artifact of Ohio having a semi-open primary instead of an open primary. Ohio did not have counties in which the number of GOP primary votes exceeded the number of general election DJT votes, although Delaware County, OH came really close. Other states with high primary turnout relative to general election turnout on the GOP side included New Hampshire (obviously), Wisconsin, and Indiana, but Wisconsin and Indiana had open primaries, so in no county in those states did Democratic primary turnout exceed HRC general election votes.

Notably, nowhere outside Utah (where Egg McMuffin took some of the Cruzlim vote) did Trump’s share in the general election fall (excluding third parties) below the Trump+Cruz share of total primary/caucus votes in places where the Dems and GOP had comparable contests.

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