Wednesday Assorted Links

1. Murphy and Woods take down Krugman on the 1993-2001 economy

2. Bizarrely long Money Illusion thread, with interesting conversations on immigration.

3. David French will support Donald Trump

4. $hillary Clinton is incompetent at advertising

5. $hillary Dynast Clinton is unusually popular among 1%er Manhattanites. Culture above the dollar.

6. What parents would demand from schools if they weren’t government-run

7. Sumner in defense of private for-profit infrastructure. Very good.

8. A worthless SJW rag explains the (((echo))). Linked to for the lulz.

Author: pithom

An atheist with an interest in the history of the ancient Near East. Author of the Against Jebel al-Lawz Wordpress blog.

7 thoughts on “Wednesday Assorted Links”

  1. Wow, journalists never cease to impress me with how thick-headed and un-self-aware they are.

    If someone puts your name in parentheses, just put his name in parentheses back. Put everyone’s name in parentheses. Like this: (((David Duke))) Alright, go get’im, boys!

    Even without that simple trick, having your name put in parentheses marks you as…someone to be trolled on Twitter.com by a couple of FBI informants posing as Klansmen! Oh, how awful! What oppression! Stalin’s progroms and Eichmann’s death camps were like vacation resorts compared to this!

    Seriously, these journalists spend way too much time online and in big cities, so they have a distorted picture of reality. Out here between the coasts, most people are very pro-Jewish and pro-Israel. Middle-America is probably the safest place in the world for Jews. Heck, there are plenty of Jews in the Alternative Right! (But of course, you wouldn’t know that if your notion of journalistic due diligence is to take other journalists’ descriptions of the Alt Right for granted.)

    1. Which Jews in the Alternative Right are you talking about, specifically?

      Yes, most people in the Heartland are very pro-Israel. They see a bit of America in it, and not necessarily for bad reasons. However, South Cyprus is virtually in the same situation, so the question is why don’t Heartland Americans identify with it? Probably because of the Bible.

      Question: if there was no Bible, how strong would support for Israel in America be relative to support for Cyprus?

      1. There’s at least one guy who writes for Vdare with a Jewish-looking surname. Same with Unz review, though of course not all of those writers are Alt Right. And there’s a bunch of supportive commenters on Alt Right sites who say they’re Jewish. Jews are intellectual and like to argue and take up unpopular positions; it’s safe to bet they’re overrepresented in the Alt Right, same as on the far Left.

        You’re probably right about why most Americans are pro-Jewish and pro-Israel.

        If there was no Bible, I’m not sure there would be an America in the first place, and of course there’d be no Israel either. But what I think you’re asking is, if Israel and its connection to Jews and Christianity wasn’t a factor, how strong would support for Israel be in America? Here’s my answer:

        During that big wave of immigration from the 1890s to the 1920s, the majority of Jews (not all, but the majority) were basically model immigrants, and our notion of a model immigrant is based on their experience in a lot of ways. So to some degree, I think the two concepts (Jews + model immigrant) have fused together for a lot of people.

        Majorities from other more recent large-scale immigrant groups (i.e. from Asia and India) have done well too, but their native cultures are relatively inaccessible to most Americans, even leaving religion aside. For example, Hebrew and English are much more closely related than English and Chinese. And Yiddish is almost German which is almost English.

        Another thing holding the Asian immigrants back is that so many of them come from countries that are at war with or bitter toward each other; the Middle-American would have to pick sides to support one or the other. Even to support someone from an Arab country or Muslim sect, he’d have to step on the toes of someone else from a different Arab country or Muslim sect. With Jews it’s relatively simpler. Sure, there are different types of Jews who sometimes dislike each other, but the Karaite and the Hassidic Jews don’t go to war the way the Sunnis and Shiite Mulsims or North and South Koreans do.

        Focusing more on the present, there’s also the fact that Israel is basically an outpost of Western culture in a hostile sea of enemies. Lately, Israel has unapologetically dealt with these enemies the way many Americans wish we would deal with ours. So anyone associated with Israel gets admired too.

        1. Israel used to be surrounded by hostile nations, but now there’s only Gaza, which is a pretty weak enemy.

          “Another thing holding the Asian immigrants back is that so many of them come from countries that are at war with or bitter toward each other; the Middle-American would have to pick sides to support one or the other”

          -I don’t see that. Every American hates the North Korean leadership, and few like Pakistan’s.

          “Jews are intellectual and like to argue and take up unpopular positions; it’s safe to bet they’re overrepresented in the Alt Right, same as on the far Left.”

          -Agree. Jews are most over-represented on the far left (Marx), among neoconservatives (Kristol), and among libertarians (Rothbard).

          “During that big wave of immigration from the 1890s to the 1920s, the majority of Jews (not all, but the majority) were basically model immigrants, and our notion of a model immigrant is based on their experience in a lot of ways.”

          -Agree. Jews are perhaps the immigrant group which has been best at rising to the top in America, whether in academia, tech, finance, or organized crime. That may well be a key influence on American support for Israel on its own, but I think it’s hard for Middle American preferences to connect with Jewish ones without some kind of religious ties. Otherwise, it might be something like Middle American support for South Korea or Taiwan -very real, but not really central to their foreign policy.

      2. You’re wrong about Gaza being the only hostile neighbor of Israel, but maybe you were just being histrionic.

        N/S Korea was a bad example. How about the various fights between countries in SE Asia, or between Pakistan and India? China and Japan have bad blood too. Most Americans couldn’t tell someone from one of those countries apart from someone from an enemy of one of those countries. Get too supportive of one or the other and you’re going to step on someone’s toes before long.

        Another factor that makes support for Jews and Israel widespread is that Jews are very non-insular. That breaks down unfamiliary faster.

        1. No, really.

          Egypt made peace with Israel under Carter.

          Bashar al-Assad was never much of an enemy of Israel.

          Hezbollah was kicked out of South Lebanon in 2006.

          Jordan gave up its claims to the West Bank in the 1980s.

          PLO recognized Israel in the 1990s.

          Only Gaza remains an enemy.

          “Another factor that makes support for Jews and Israel widespread is that Jews are very non-insular.”

          -You’re right. Where are the Chinese Hollywood directors?

          “Get too supportive of one or the other and you’re going to step on someone’s toes before long.”

          -Who knows? Maybe. Both Pakistan and India have so-called friendly relations with the U.S.

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